Technology troubles

We had noticed, of late, that our broadband internet was not living up to its promised speed but we kept making excuses for it. On Saturday evening we had some heavy rain (153mm) and on Sunday we were unable to make a successful internet connection although the modem was telling us we had.  To cut a very long story (2 hours on the phone to the ISP) our signal has dropped to unacceptable levels due to water leaking into a previously sealed beam thingy (sorry to be so technical).  Plastic components do not last long in the tropics!   Now a further wait for a technician plus new part…..however, all is not lost.

We now have wireless technology via the nextG and while rather expensive the pre-Christmas special is helpful and at least allows us to remain in touch with the outside world.

While our focus is always on the environment;  learning about it,  and living in it as sustainably as we are able we find that communicating via the internet has become a major part of our life.  Emails save trips to the post box which is 2.5km away and banking via the internet saves a 35km trip so although it is certainly possible to survive without it we are pleased that we don’t have to.

So it would seem after some more rain in the early hours of this morning and continuing  isolated showers that our long dry spell has well and truly finished.  We have started planting out some native grasses that we’ve been propagating as well as a few more trees and shrubs here and there – a lovely time of year.

 

 

From the verandah I managed a couple of shots of this Brown-backed Honeyeater enjoying a quick feed on Callistemon “The Bluff” in between the showers.  A variety of Callistemon certainly provide a reliable food source for the nectar eaters.

 

 

6 responses to “Technology troubles

  1. My sympathy. How I love chatting to my ISP – or, worse, a heavily accented techie!

  2. The internet is such an important facility outside the major centres and yet that’s where coverage is so darned poor.

    Having said that, my satellite dish is holding up quite well, despite the occasional drop out. (Usually in the middle of sending an email, of course!) It hasn’t been through really heavy rain yet, just a few downpours. I suspect that I’ll be telling a different story when the rain finally settles in.

    Because it was too difficult to dig with all the tree roots, the techies had to run part of the cable above ground. It’ll only be a matter of time before the white-tailed rats see how edible it is …

    • Yes you are right about the internet being an important facility especially in country areas. We were thrilled when we were connected to broadband satellite in early 2007, it is so much faster than dial-up and leaves the phone free – we really haven’t had many problems apart from the fan in the modem giving up on three occasions and we now have a fan-less modem. However, now having experienced the speed of wireless will we continue to be satisfied?

      I suspect that our bank account will probably make the decision for us but wireless is certainly a handy back up for power outages.

  3. I have broadband here but friends and neighbors who have tried to get it over the last year or so can’t. They are told there are no more line connections available so they HAVE to go wireless! My broadband has slowed down (to the place of extreme frustration sometimes!) but I am not about to complain and loose it for wireless. The situation is even worse for HD TV and digital radio! As long as services are so poor out here overcrowding will get worse and worse in the major centres.
    Lovely photos of the little honeyeater in the callistemon.

  4. Interesting comments Mick…I hadn’t thought about the lack of such services discouraging people from moving away from major centres but you are probably correct. We only just have a signal from Radio National (it bounces off Thornton Peak and can be extremely fickle) and I have lived without TV for more than 24 years so I admit I have no idea what the current status is in Daintree re HD TV and digital radio.

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