Tag Archives: Durian flowers

Warm fuzzies and heady aromas

Travelling slowly down our ‘green tunnel’ driveway this morning, on our weekly expedition to the Mossman Market, I noticed a different shape on the bamboo hand-rail across the culvert at the bottom of the hill.  The ‘shape’ rapidly resolved itself into several perching ducks!  And there were more on the pond …. so nine Spotted Whistling Ducks came back.

1-SWD perched on the bamboo hand-rail

After several days of rain a couple of weeks ago there has been no sign of them in our main wetland system.  No-one else has reported any local sightings but there are lots of little ponds hidden away in our gullies so perhaps they just seek out more shelter?  Whatever their story, it is always pleasing to see them; gives us a nice warm fuzzy feeling knowing that we’ve provided some habitat for them.

1-P1040613

Orchard News:
Our Durian trees are flowering and there is a heady, slightly musky aroma around the orchard.  A couple of nights ago, with the moon still not quite full, we went for an evening walk to enjoy the flowers and watch the moths and blossom bats flying in to feed on the copious nectar.  The night was so still the sound of nectar dripping, onto the carpet of old leaves and spent flowers under the tree, provided a background to the fluttering of wings and an occasional bat squeak.
I still marvel at the sheer number of flowers produced by these trees.  They start opening in the afternoon and by morning there is a carpet of flowers on the ground.

 

1-Fallen Durian flowers

1-Durian flowers early afternoon

Durian flowers beginning to open in the early afternoon

Blossum Bat in Durian Flowers

Some flowers now fully open with Blossom bat feeding.  

 

 

The King’s batty attendants

We could smell the heavy, musty scent of the flowering Durian  (Durio zibethinus)  as we approached our orchard last evening.  We only have 4 trees but they are laden with flowers and attracting quite a lot of attention, especially at night.

This photo only captures a portion of the tree with flowers  in various stages along the main and smaller lateral branches up to a height of approximately 10 metres.   As well as many blossom bats (possibly Northern Blossom Bats but we haven’t a positive ID), there are moths and beetles attending the flowers at night.  The flowers open from mid afternoon to late evening with most pollen being shed before midnight and all flower parts excepting the pistil fall to the ground.

Blossom bat on Durian flower

We walked under a tree and shone our headlamps upwards to watch the diminutive blossom bats flitting in and out, hardly seeming to stop on the flowers.  Blossom bats make a ‘kissing’ sound and when I imitated them I would have them swooping really close so I could feel the air movement from their wings on my head.  In the photo above you can see large drops of nectar spilling out – no wonder the bat has buried itself  in a flower!

Blossom bats on Durian flower

Allen didn’t realize he had caught one in flight until he looked at the photos on the computer screen.  We are fascinated by the tiny muscular ‘arms’ – the bats don’t waste any time when they are feeding, a brief moment on a flower and they are on the move again.

Blossom bat  tongue

All these photos can be enlarged by clicking on them and it is particularly worthwhile in this case to see the detail of the tongue in action.


This rather attractive (as yet unidentified) moth was also taking advantage of the plentiful nectar  – and the next morning native bees were landing on the carpet of spent flowers lying under the tree, apparently gathering pollen.  So while we look forward,with cautious optimism (having had past disappointments), to a bountiful crop of this glorious King of Fruits many other creatures have benefited from the flowers already.

Reference:  “Tropical Tree Fruits for Australia” Queensland Department of Primary Industries 1984