Tag Archives: Green Pygmy-Goose

Life on the Ponds

Feeding with a friend

Feeding with a friend

This immature Jacana and solitary female Green Pygmy-goose spent several days together on one of our ponds – I’m not sure who was helping who or if they just felt comfortable being together. We usually see Pygmy-geese in pairs so I don’t know what the story is with this single female and after almost a week in residence we haven’t seen her for several days now.

Jacana's defense

Jacana's defense

One afternoon last week I was enjoying a few quiet moments in the hide, observing the Magpie  Geese and watching this twosome working their way up the pond towards me when a Forest Kingfisher swooped low across the pond towards them.    The photo shows the defensive pose the Jacana took as the Kingfisher flew towards it  – I thought I might have got a flash of blue wing in a corner of the photo but no………  After two “attacks”  the Jacana and the Pygmy-goose moved back up the pond out of the Forest Kingfisher’s territory.

Magpie Goose watching the action

Magpie Goose watching the action

And watching all this excitement was the Magpie Goose on “lookout” duty.  Even though most of the flock will feed at times during the day there will always be at least one roosting high in a tree ready to give a warning of ‘danger’ .

Magpie Geese, with their half-webbed feet, frequently roost in trees but their perching behaviour often appears quite awkward and they are apt to misjudge the strength of branches with somewhat unfortunate results for the tree.  During the day they seem just as comfortable resting on a handy clump of sedge or a sunny bank until it is time to feed or bath again.

Sometimes on clear moonlit nights we hear Magpie Geese calling  softly as they fly around the property or arrive late from another venue.

November News Snippets

White-browed Crake frequently calling to each other, flying low over the mass of water lilies and feeding along the muddy edges in the shelter of the sedge. Often they venture onto the lily pads, fluttering about to stir up the insects which they feed on as well as water lily seeds.
The Bush Stone-Curlew are still a family of 3 with their one chick now about adult size.
A single male Green Pygmy-Goose arrived and after some hesitant introductions he has attached himself to the trio although he is often observed trailing behind them.
Pheasant Coucal are obviously in full breeding plumage, their gurgling calls part of the late afternoons on a hot day in Spring.
The Metallic Starling nesting tree is lively with offspring of all ages, some nearly fledging while others are still being fed in the nest. And in the centre of this huge native fig is the Brahminy Kite nest with an adult sitting and the other not usually too far away.