Tag Archives: Litoria rothii

Life and death in the monsoon

The arrival of wet season rains is a time of renewal – the wetlands are replenished, the frogs breed and provide food for many other creatures. We find the sound and smell of the rain itself as well as the deafening cacophony of frog calls exciting ……. last night we had a look in the pond adjacent to our verandah.
A water spider, Pisauridae species of the genus Dolomedes, had captured a Graceful Tree-frog (Litoria gracilenta), one of many calling around the pond.  According to Arachne.org.au “As Australian Pisaurids are being revised by Robert Raven at Queensland Museum, until this review is complete it will be difficult to correctly identify many Dolomedes species”

Dolomedes with Litoria gracilenta Dolomedes with Litoria gracilenta-002One of the laughing frogs (Litoria rothii) wasn’t indulging in such risky behaviour and had camouflaged itself quite well against our house python.  (House python is made of concrete covered wire and twines up a verandah pillar)

Litoria rothii

In the car-port a white-lipped green tree-frog (Litoria infrafrenata) was hanging onto our vehicle while numerous sedge frogs (Litoria bicolour, Litoria fallax)   called and jumped around the house;  several had to be taken outside again after they found their way inside.

Litoria infrafrenata-001

This morning we had a look for the remains of the spider’s meal;  it was dragged up onto one of the rocks surrounding the pool –  a somewhat gruesome sight softened by the flower petal decoration;  exactly as found.

Litoria gracilenta corpse-001

And so the circle of life continues –  frog eggs (probably L. gracilenta) on the water below the frog corpse.

Frog eggs

Cool green theme for a hot day

Today the temperature rose dramatically but the humidity remained low, a breeze was blowing and it would have been enjoyable weather if it hadn’t been for the smoke haze from the extensive fires on the Atherton Tablelands.  As an ex-resident of country Victoria I particularly dislike smoky, hot, dry days.

After spending a beautiful (and productive) morning in the garden I went looking for the Barred Cuckoo-shrikes I could hear – they were feeding out-of-sight in a large fig tree but I had a happy time observing the Double-eyed Fig-parrots that were much lower down in the same tree, along with Fig Birds and Yellow Orioles.  The melodic calls of the Yellow Orioles seem to increase in frequency as the weather warms until they become a background to our summer days.

wild_wings_swampy_things_birds_yellow oriole Continue reading