Category Archives: Butterflies

Colour in the Sun

Although we’re still having occasional rain showers the weather bureau declared the end of ‘the wet’ a few weeks ago. Some clear mornings and gorgeous sunny days have lifted everyone’s spirits, all the more appreciated after our long and very wet summer.
About a month ago we started seeing extraordinary numbers of butterflies, including some species we had not previously observed. They didn’t need the weather bureau to tell them the wet season downpours had finished! Four O’Clock Moths have been flying at all hours of the day and every Corky Bark tree, Carallia brachiata, seems to be hosting quite a number of their vibrant looper caterpillars. The one below was trying a different pose which it held like a yogi even with a camera lens at very close range.

This larva is trying an ‘innocent’ pose but the munched leaves tell a different story
Four O’Clock Moth – Dysphania fenestrata
Red Lacewing – Cethosia cydippe
Male Cruiser – Vindula arsinoe

The larval food plant of both Cruisers and Red Lacewings is the native passionfruit vine Adenia heterophylla. It’s bright red fruit is very decorative and is much appreciated by native rodents as well as cockatoos who usually don’t wait for the fruit to ripen! The seeds are obviously distributed successfully as we find these vines popping up in all sorts of places without any help from us.

Native Passionfruit – Adenia heterophylla
Hamadryad – Tellervo zoilus

Although the Hamadryad very closely resembles the Black and White Aeroplane it actually belongs in an entirely different sub-family and is the only member of Ithomiinae in Australia. It has close relatives in southern and central America. Peter Valentine mentions that the similarity between the these two species may be an example of mimicry by the aeroplane in order to gain benefit from the toxicity of the Hamadryad. The flight of the Hamadryad is more leisurely than that of the very similar Aeroplane and close attention to the wing pattern is required in order to confirm identification.

Black & White Aeroplane – Neptis praslini
Small Oakblue- Arhopala wildei

Described by Peter Valentine as “the most elusive of all the oakblues” Allen did well to photograph this beautifully patterned little butterfly. A dimorphic species, the upperside of the female is white whereas the male is blue. Peter Valentine’s delightful and informative book on Australian Tropical Butterflies has been very useful this year as Allen was able to identify the species he found that were unknown to us.

Orange Bushbrown – Mycalesis terminus

This not uncommon but very pretty little butterfly is often seen feeding on rotting fruit. The larvae feed on grasses and don’t seem to be particularly choosy as to which species.
This is just a small selection of the butterflies seen this year. They are interesting subjects however some, like the Green Spotted Triangle, just have to be enjoyed as they move fast and seemingly continuously. The photos of the Four O’Clock moth are mine, all the others were taken by Allen and he’s still trying for one of the Green Spotted Triangle!

After ‘the wet’

So much colour outside our kitchen window!  After what seems like a long wet season,we are not the only ones enjoying some sunny days and our garden is busy with many birds and butterflies.   Golden Penda, (Xanthostemon chrysanthus) is a very popular ornamental native species which has been extensively planted in our region and it is now flowering prolifically, leaving a carpet of golden yellow stamens lying on the ground beneath each tree.

20140523Wild_Wings_Swampy_Things_Dusky honeyeater on Penda

Dusky Honeyeater frantically feeding

20140523Wild_Wings_Swampy_Things_Macleay's honeyeater in Penda

Macleay’s Honeyeater – the eye only just visible in the flowers.

Its a wonderful time of the year to be out in the garden, not too hot and there is lots to do but also much to gaze at and I’ve dashed back to the house for my camera on several occasions.  The Macleay’s Honeyeater just won’t stop for moment in its feeding frenzy so I’ve had lots of trouble getting a shot that is even partially in focus.

20140523Wild_Wings_Swampy_Things_Cruiser female on Costus

Female Cruiser (Vindula arsinoe)

20140523Wild_Wings_Swampy_Things_male birdwing on Costus

Male Cairns Birdwing (Ornithoptera priamus)

The flower in these photos is a native Costus (Costus potierae) which looks very similar to the exotic Costus speciosus but can be identified from the latter by the hairy upper leaf surface.  Costus potierae can be found in Cape York, some of the Torres St Islands and N E Queensland but it only occurs very close to sea level.  The white flowers attract many butterflies and small birds while the beautiful red bracts provide a brilliant colour accent amongst the verdant garden foliage.

20140523Wild_Wings_Swampy_Things_Ulysses on Costus

Ulysses butterfly (Papilio ulysses)

The flashes of blue from several Ulysses flying around is impossible to capture in a still photo – this splash of blue gives the general idea.

20140523Wild_Wings_Swampy_Things_yellow-spotted honeyeater1

Yellow-spotted Honeyeater

Yellow-spotted Honeyeaters are probably our most commonly sighted bird species and I was delighted that this one posed so nicely while deciding on where to fly next.

 

Birds and Butterflies

Delias mysis mysis at Wild Wings & Swampy Things Daintree

Wandering Whistling Duck have returned to the wetlands after an absence of a few months. They are so well camouflaged amongst the waterlilies that I wouldn’t have noticed them if I hadn’t been scanning around with the binoculars.
Grey and Rufous Fantail have arrived for their winter residency; it is always delightful to watch them hunting for insects. We have recently enjoyed regular close sightings of Gould’s Bronze Cuckoo on the edge of the rainforest along the creek where there is usually much activity in the morning sun. And there are lots of butterflies about, especially when there is a burst of sun in between showers on a a wet day.

The photo shows a Union Jack butterfly (Delias mysis mysis)  feeding on Melaleuca  blossom.