Category Archives: Daintree Plants

Tropical aromas

The late afternoon air is quite suddenly full of the intense aroma of rotting flesh.  It wafts across the garden in an almost visible cloud and settles around us.  Quite a contrast to the subtle scents that most usually fill our warm tropical evenings this one demands immediate attention.  I grab my camera and let the drone of flies lead me to the newly emerged flower of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius.

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Amorphophallus paeoniifolius also known as Elephant Yam due to the size of the underground tuber.

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Occurring from India to New Guinea as well as in tropical parts of Australia this bizarre plant is dormant through the dry season, producing its solitary flower in response to rainfall.  A single large spadix topped by a fleshy, foul smelling wrinkly knob with a spathe surrounding the entire flower.  Carrion flies and beetles are attracted to the smell and perform a valuable service as pollinators.  The Green Ants (Oecophylla sp) on the spathe appeared to be feeding on dead insects, they are not recorded as pollinators.

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Before returning to the house I treated my nose to a breath of Gardenia ‘Wild Wings’ (our accidental hybrid) followed by a whiff of  Bloomfield Penda (Xanthostemon verticillatus).  Olfactory balance easily restored.

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Cassowary update

I often enjoy some bird watching while working in the kitchen – at any time of the day.  However this was a first!  I looked up when I saw movement in my peripheral vision and was absolutely gobsmacked to find this Cassowary wandering about in the garden just outside the window.  I quietly alerted Allen and we watched this amazing bird walk right up to the window and apparently eyeball us …… what it was probably doing was looking at its own reflection.  Allen managed a few shots through the glass and the fly-screen before it calmly wandered off around the garden.

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Fabulous being able to see it so close and know it wasn’t aware of our presence.  When Allen did take a step outside later it moved away quickly but once he returned to the house the bird reappeared to continue foraging under the palms and under the fruiting Mischocarpus exangulatus [Red bell Mischocarp]

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Many of the trees we have planted, in the hope of attracting cassowary along with other native birds and mammals,  have matured sufficiently to produce fruit.  We hope we will be lucky enough to have occasional visits from this young bird so we can witness his/her growth into an adult cassowary.

Young visitors

We have been lucky enough to have family, including 3 grandchildren aged 5 years and under, visiting us during these school holidays . While it was rather chaotic at times, it was a very happy time with many special moments shared.

Children love talking about poo so I was thrilled to find a very special deposit near our vegetable garden that I could show them. While I understand that not everyone gets excited about poo, for us to find evidence of a youngish Cassowary feeding on the property is particularly pleasing.  I knew the dropping to be less than 24 hours old as I had been in the same area the previous afternoon.  Mostly the seeds of Eleocarpus grandis  [Blue Quandong] fruit with at least one Cryptocarya oblatus [Tarzali Silkwood].

Juvenile Cassowary dropping

Juvenile Cassowary dropping

A few days later Allen and I were enjoying a cup of tea with Celia on the verandah while the children played nearby.  She suddenly started pointing in a very excited and apparently speechless manner.  As Allen and I turned around to look in the direction she was indicating she managed to gasp “Cassowary!” At this we all quietly got out of our chairs and went to look as the bird had wandered out of sight.  It wasn’t far away and was just calmly foraging so we called out to the 5 year old cousins to come and look very quietly.  I am pleased to say that they did just as we asked and did manage to get a look at the bird.  I don’t expect them to grasp the significance of the event but I did want them to at least have a look.

Juvenile Cassowary

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAllen managed to grab some record shots but he didn’t want to chase it away by following it and hoping for a better photo.

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Nearly out of sight – Cassowaries have a wonderful ability to merge into Rainforest and ‘disappear’.

We have seen more droppings in the house garden today so the bird is definitely still around.

Pruning hazards

During a pruning frenzy yesterday I came across this rather large Spiny Leaf Insect or Macleays Spectre (Extatosoma tiaratum).  She was looking decidedly nervous as I approached enthusiastically with my secateurs, snipping away at branches and so removing leaves she had been happily feeding upon.

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I don’t blame her for feeling under threat as she was left somewhat exposed, despite her good camouflage.  Needless to say I changed course and left that area of the garden for another day.  Luckily we have planted quite a number of Xanthostemon verticillatus as it appears to be a favourite food for a variety of stick insects.  A quick check today has revealed that she is on the same bush but safely tucked under some green cover.  This garden surrounds the pool where I found a male Spiny Leaf Insect in 2013.  Which leads me to wonder if I need to improve my powers of observation ….. or perhaps I haven’t been spending enough time tending to the shrubs in that garden.


And in other news ……….. the Amethyst python curled up around her eggs since November last year has now moved on.  My granddaughter and I checked under the cover on Jan 1st and both snakes were there.  When I checked on Jan 3rd the Carpet Snake was still guarding her eggs but only the empty shells of the Amethyst were left.  No sign of young snakes and no sign of the adult.  The Carpet snake is still curled up in the same area but in recent days I have seen her stretched out and I can see her eggs are empty.  We have no idea why she remains in the same position.

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From dust to green

After nearly four months camping in our tent, while we travelled north to Darwin then west across to Roebuck Bay, we have left the dust behind and returned to the lush green of Daintree.  We’ve now unpacked, cleaned up most of our gear before storing it and the vehicle is mostly clean inside.  Although it’s taken a few days to truly feel ‘at home’ again we are both appreciating the space, the green and the peace as well as our walking tracks.

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Reflections

The water levels in the wetlands are low, as we would expect at this time of the year, and we are not the only ones enjoying easy access.  This lovely girl was enjoying some sun in the swamp this morning and was undisturbed by our presence on the driveway.

Swamp Wallaby

Female Swamp Wallaby

Floscopa scandens ,which we now have growing in several areas around the wetlands,  is looking very lush and healthy with lots of pale pink flowers.  Although the water level has dropped the ground is still holding a lot of moisture, the grass is still green and we’re happy to be here.

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Wild Wings …..

Little Kingfisher – Ceyx pusillus is one of a special group of tropical Australian iconic bird species.  Our wetlands’ designs included areas we hoped would create habitats appealing to this beautiful jewel of a bird and I can now say with confidence that we have indeed achieved our aim!

Little Kingfisher

Little Kingfisher

Cottonwood – Hibiscus tiliaceous which thrives in wet situations and tends to spread (a habit not favoured by some) now helps to provide shade and shelter around the wetland overflow .  Both Azure and Little Kingfishers use an overhanging Cottonwood branch to watch the fish in the clear water flowing over the spillway before diving in for a feed.

These secretive, tiny birds with the oversized bills prefer dark well vegetated waterways which make challenging photographic conditions.   Allen has been patiently returning to the bird hide, time after time, hoping that he could catch it on one its brief forays into the open.  Finally this morning he had some success and although the light was poor due to overcast conditions the blue of this amazing, diminutive bird shines brilliantly.

Flying high

Perfect weather combined with an efficient operator has resulted in some fabulous overhead views of Wild Wings & Swampy Things.  Never having seen a drone in action I was keen to observe the launching process but didn’t expect that it would be quite so exciting.  I think I may possibly have squealed with delight as the drone took off,  headed skywards!  Tom let it hover overhead for a few moments while it got its bearings and then  it was out of our sight as he sent it on a circuit of the property.

Drone on landing pad

Drone on launching pad

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We have lift off!

The early morning light was perfect to capture the colour variation of our very green landscape.

Freshwater swimming pool nestled in the garden

Freshwater swimming pool nestled in the garden in front of the house

The view below is taken from near Barratt Creek looking NNE over our orchard in the bottom right hand corner, a glimpse of our house can be seen in  the centre of the photo.  The boundary lines are approximate and the view somewhat distorted due to the angle.

View to Thornton's Peak. Daintree River visible in top third of photo.

View to Thornton’s Peak. Daintree River visible in top third of photo.

Dagmar Range is part of the Greater Daintree National Park which begins on the other side of Barratt Creek so Wild Wings & Swampy Things Nature Refuge forms an important corridor between a large conservation area and the Daintree River catchment.

Dagmar Range to the SW

Dagmar Range to the SW

The view towards Daintree Village from Barratt Creek shows the contrasting vegetation of the cattle farming areas.  While the hills make a beautiful backdrop our front boundary is the Mossman-Daintree road, hidden under the trees.

Looking towards Daintree Village from Barratt Creek

Looking towards Daintree Village from Barratt Creek

Wetlands in the foreground, bird hide is a light speck in the green, main house is just to the left of centre and Daintree Village is visible as a cluster of buildings in the far distance with the Daintree river on the right hand side of the photo.

 

Busy twittering

Delightful little Silvereyes, with their gentle high-pitched chatter, are not an uncommon species.   They can be found all down the east coast, in Tasmania and in south-west Australia with some variation between the different identified races.  We have Zosterops lateralis;  race vegetus  –  a long name for such a small bird.

 Silvereye in Common Pepper Vine

Silvereye in Common Pepper Vine

 Eating the fruit of Common Pepper Vine

Eating the fruit of Common Pepper Vine

Plentiful fruit in this native Pepper vine, Piper caninum, is proving very popular  and they seem to slide down whole without any apparent problem.   While Silvereyes are known as a pest in some orchards and especially in vineyards we have the luxury of enough Black Sapote to share.  Now that the crop is nearly finished the fruit-loving birds are competing with each other for a share and so the Silvereyes have shown their feisty nature as they compete with various Honeyeaters for the softest fruit.

 Silvereye with Black Sapote

Silvereye with
Black Sapote

Feathered Palm with Feathered Friends

Alexandra Palms (Archontophoenix alexandrae) provide a valuable food source for many fruit eating birds in the wet tropics of the Daintree region.  Native to this area the palms germinate easily and a fruiting palm usually has many young palms at its base.  For many months Alexandra palms have been providing a source of fruit, so for a long period our garden has been full of colour, movement and the soft ‘wuk, wuk’ of Wompoo Fruit-doves as they enjoy the plentiful fruit along with Fig birds and Orioles.   There was a regular Wompoo visiting some palms in front of our verandah where we enjoy morning coffee so it was quite entertaining to watch its reaction to the other birds eating from the same panicle of fruit.

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Wompoo with female Figbird above, male Figbird below

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Figbird grabs fruit while upside-down

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Wompoo gulps down another

However, in the last few weeks the dynamics of the garden have changed dramatically since the return of Metallic starlings from their winter sojourn further north.  The fruiting palms in our front garden have been stripped by flocks of these voracious feeders as the slower eating Wompoos made hopeless attempts to discourage them.

The Wompoos are now making the most of the fruiting Quandongs (Elaeocarpus angustifolius) – their blue fruit is also popular with Top-knot pigeons and Cassowarys,  and being much larger in size it is not consumed by Metallic Starlings.

Busy birds

I have managed to take a better photo of the Macleay’s Honeyeater – its not perfect but I am improving!  The birds enjoy our well sheltered bird baths but it does make photography more challenging in the low light.

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Macleay’s Honeyeater after enjoying a bath

Victoria’s Riflebirds have been seen feeding all about the property recently, all those sighted (so far) have been female or immature birds and most commonly eating fruit of the Bleeding Heart tree, Homalanthus populifolius.   However, we have also watched a Victoria’s Riflebird  feeding on the fruit of the native Costus,  Costus potierae,  which we have planted in our house garden.  Yellow-spotted Honeyeaters have also been eating the Costus fruit, so this plant is not only an attractive ornamental but a useful food plant for the birds.

Victoria's Riflebird, female or immature

Victoria’s Riflebird, female or immature

This male Double-eyed Fig Parrot was sitting on a branch close to my vegetable garden.  It had been feeding on the fruit of Red-leaf Fig, Ficus congesta. 

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Double-eyed Fig Parrot race macleayana, male.

While this particular tree had obviously been visited by a number of fruit eating birds, it is not often the fruit of choice.  Many times we see the fruit quite untouched when other, more desirable, fruit is in abundance.  Red-leaf Figs are common pioneer species in areas of regenerating rainforest and provide a reliable source of food at times when the fruit of preferred species is unavailable.

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Red-leaf Fig, Ficus congesta. Detail of fruit on tree trunk.

After several different ‘poses’ on the branch this gorgeous little parrot stretched his jaw open wide, probably necessary after much processing of the tiny fig seed, although I confess it did look to me like a yawn.  And then he moved up higher in the tree out of sight and our photo session was over.

Double-eyed Fig Parrot stretching his jaw

Double-eyed Fig Parrot stretching his jaw