Tag Archives: Daintree wetlands

Feeding Frenzy

Rainfall is imminent in the next few days;   “90% chance of showers and possible thunderstorms with areas of rain” but by Jan 2nd the forecast is just “Rain. Possible storm”.   It seems like water levels in the wetlands are about to rise but while there are still lots of muddy edges and shallow ponds full of fish and crustaceans there are busy birds with full bellies.


Great Egret trying to get a firm grip on a River Prawn.  Macrobrachium sp.


Now in a firm hold but still quite a challenge to swallow


Azure Kingfisher with one of many fish caught in a morning session.


Azure Kingfisher often flies to this horizontal perch as it’s convenient to use for bashing  prey prior to consumption.

Pale-vented Bushhen

Pale-vented Bush Hen – while we did see it catch fish occasionally it was mainly hunting on or around the vegetation.  This is possibly a dragonfly nymph.

Birds all have their own particular hunting methods and it is quite amusing to watch a Great Egret with its ‘wait quietly and pounce’ method becoming annoyed at a Little Egret which tends to be rather hyperactive, stirring the water up with its feet to see what is disturbed.  This Little Egret is in breeding colours and plumage, gloriously white even though it is spending its days in the muddy shallows.


Little Egret in the process of swallowing a fish.

Glorious Mud

I have always found myself attracted to water;  whether a vast expanse of sea or a tranquil lake, a cool pool on a hot day, a winding tree-lined river or a waterfall.  In my very early days, like most children, my joy was mostly centred around the splashing qualities of water.  These days  I usually have a reason for getting wet and muddy!  Pond maintenance (a bit of weeding) is not really a chore to me as there are so many wonderful distractions, and it is just such a good feeling to be hanging around the ponds.

The cyclical nature of wetlands is a learning process – Allen and I still find the onset of heavy rain and the resulting water flow into the ponds as exciting as always.  After months of dry weather it is wonderful to see fresh water flowing over the spillways however there is really so much more to observe when we have mud!

Allen has been spending quite a bit of time with his camera in the bird hide recently;  his patience and his quiet observation has resulted in some lovely photos.


Snipe preening – either Latham’s or Swinhoe’s.

Until a definitive photo of the tail feathers being fanned can be obtained we can’t be absolutely sure about this bird’s identification but it is just lovely seeing them so busy feeding.


Snipe feeding together – these two are thought to be Swinhoe’s

Pale-vented Bush-hen

Pale-vented Bush Hen – while these birds are resident on the property we mostly only get a glimpse as they dash into the next bit of cover.  Their voices however, can be heard loud and clear – a loud and raucous call for a small bird with such a neat appearance.

Female Black Bittern

Black Bittern – standing on the edge of ‘Crake Island’

Another bird that we frequently hear calling at this time of the year but mostly only see once we have disturbed it feeding is the Black Bittern.   There have been many calls recently and we expect there may be more than one nest to be found along Barratt Creek.

Great-billed Heron

Great-billed Heron

Great-billed Heron

I had to include a couple more photos of the Great-billed Heron as I get such a thrill seeing these magnificent birds and these photos are better than some of my earlier attempts.  We have more than one of these Herons regularly feeding in our wetlands and they don’t seem to be quite as nervous as they used to be although definitely still considered ‘shy’.

Wild Wings …..

Little Kingfisher – Ceyx pusillus is one of a special group of tropical Australian iconic bird species.  Our wetlands’ designs included areas we hoped would create habitats appealing to this beautiful jewel of a bird and I can now say with confidence that we have indeed achieved our aim!

Little Kingfisher

Little Kingfisher

Cottonwood – Hibiscus tiliaceous which thrives in wet situations and tends to spread (a habit not favoured by some) now helps to provide shade and shelter around the wetland overflow .  Both Azure and Little Kingfishers use an overhanging Cottonwood branch to watch the fish in the clear water flowing over the spillway before diving in for a feed.

These secretive, tiny birds with the oversized bills prefer dark well vegetated waterways which make challenging photographic conditions.   Allen has been patiently returning to the bird hide, time after time, hoping that he could catch it on one its brief forays into the open.  Finally this morning he had some success and although the light was poor due to overcast conditions the blue of this amazing, diminutive bird shines brilliantly.


In mid November, some tourists on the Daintree River witnessed  two Great-billed Herons fighting on the river bank.  As the bird watchers keenly observed the fracas, the birds fell into the water and a nearby crocodile took the opportunity to grab one of them.

Subsequent to this event being reported on the local network we noticed that the Great-billed Heron we regularly see on our wetlands was limping and looking a bit sorry for himself.  (There has been a presumption that it was two males fighting)  During the last week he has improved considerably – we have seen him quite frequently and, perhaps due to his bruises, he hasn’t been in a hurry to fly off as soon as he catches sight of us.

November 21st feeling a bit sorry for itself.

November 21st feeling a bit sorry for itself – a few days after the reported fracas.

Today we were spending some time with a fellow birding friend who was visiting from Cairns and so, after a walk around some of the tracks, we sat in the bird hide chatting and exchanging stories.  As we were watching a Little Egret land in a tree in the distance, the Great-billed Heron flew across in front of us and landed on the bund wall in full view.  Although we kept chatting the bird was unperturbed by us.  It was, however, disturbed by some Figbirds which caused it to ruffle up its plumes then give us a demonstration of its guttural call before eventually flying a little further on to hunt along the exposed muddy bank.

Great-billed Heron

Great-billed Heron

What a privilege to have the pleasure of seeing such a shy bird, not only finding our wetlands a reliable feeding ground but starting to feel less threatened by our presence nearby.

Great-billed Heron

Great-billed Heron